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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Security+
 9  Chapter 1:  General Security Concepts (Domain 1.0; 30%)
      9  1.4  Attacks
           9  1.4.3  Spoofing

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How TCP/IP Permits Spoofing
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Problem #2: An Attacker Can Pretend to Be From A Trusted Host
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Problem #1: Spoofing Can Worsen a DoS Attack

In the example of a user browsing a website, this technique is fairly pointless. However, if this technique is used in conjunction with a Denial Of Service attack (as discussed in 1.4.1), an attacker can use this to their advantage. First, they can hide their true source IP address, which, in today’s world of lawsuits against hackers is a fairly strong motivation, making it difficult to trace them. Secondly, they can continually change the source IP address of the DoS packets, making it hard for network administrators to drop the packets at firewalls using source IP address filters. To take it a stage further, an attacker could spoof the source IP address of the DoS packets to make them appear to originate from within the target’s network.

While this technique may not always work, it can give poorly configured firewalls and routers a lot of difficulties. This is why we recommended in section 1.4.1 that you implement router rules against this.

Spoofing

Spoofing is an attack in which packets are made to appear to originate from a system other than the one they really originated from.

If your network monitor or Intrusion Detection System detects that you are receiving packets from the Internet which list an address on your internal network as the source IP address, it is likely that you are experiencing an IP spoofing attack.


Figure 10: By forging IP header information at computer P, computer B falsely responds to computer A. Given enough packets a DoS occurs.

 


Previous Topic/Section
How TCP/IP Permits Spoofing
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Pages in Current Topic/Section
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Problem #2: An Attacker Can Pretend to Be From A Trusted Host
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