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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Security+
 9  Chapter 3:  Infrastructure Security (Domain 3.0; 20%)

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3.3.4  Tunneling
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3.4  Intrusion Detection
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Pop Quiz 3.1
(Page 2 of 2)



Answers

1. The technology used to detect anomalies is known as IDS .

Explanation: Intrusion Detection is a quickly evolving domain of expertise. In the past year we have seen giant steps forward in this area. We are now seeing IDS engines that will detect anomalies, and that have some built-in intelligence. It is no longer a simple game of matching signatures in your network traffic.

 

2. IDSs verify, itemize, and characterize threats from outside and inside the network.

Explanation: IDSs verify, itemize, and characterize the threat from both outside and inside your organization's network, assisting you in making sound decisions regarding your allocation of computer security resources. Using IDSs in this manner is important, as many people mistakenly deny that anyone (outsider or insider) would be interested in breaking into their networks. Furthermore, the information that IDSs give you regarding the source and nature of attacks allows you to make decisions regarding security strategy driven by demonstrated need, not guesswork or folklore. While an IDS can be deployed in one's DMZ to look only for Internet or outside network intrusions, it can also be used internal to a network as well.

 

3. A drawback of Network-based IDSs is they cannot analyze encryped information .

Explanation: Network-based IDSs cannot analyze encrypted information. This problem is increasing as more organizations (and attackers) use virtual private networks. Most network-based IDSs cannot tell whether or not an attack was successful; they can only discern that an attack was initiated. This means that after a network-based IDS detects an attack, administrators must manually investigate each attacked host to determine whether it was indeed penetrated.

 

4. An extranet can be viewed as part of a company's intranet that is extended to users outside the company .

Explanation: An extranet is a private network that uses the Internet protocol and the public telecommunication system to securely share part of a business's information or operations with suppliers, vendors, partners, customers, or other businesses. An extranet can be viewed as part of a company's intranet that is extended to users outside the company. It has also been described as a "state of mind" in which the Internet is perceived as a way to do business with other companies as well as to sell products to customers. The same benefits that HTML, Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), and other Internet technologies have brought to the Internet and to corporate intranets now seem designed to accelerate business between businesses.

Typically the portion of a company's network inside the company is referred to as its intranet. Generally extranet users do not have administrator or root privileges.

 

5. An intranet is a network that is mostly contained within a company.

Explanation: An intranet is a private network that is contained within an enterprise. It may consist of many interlinked local area networks and also use leased lines in the wide area network. Typically, an intranet includes connections through one or more gateway computers to the outside Internet. The main purpose of an intranet is to share company information and computing resources among employees. An intranet can also be used to facilitate working in groups and for teleconferences.


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3.3.4  Tunneling
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3.4  Intrusion Detection
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