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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Security+
 9  Chapter 2:  Communication Security (Domain 2.0; 20%)

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Getting Ready for Chapter 2 - Answers

1. RADIUS is the protocol used for carrying authentication, authorization, and configuration information between a Network Access Server and a shared Authentication Server.

Explanation: RADIUS is a protocol for carrying authentication, authorization, and configuration information between a Network Access Server, which desires to authenticate its links and a shared Authentication Server. RADIUS uses a centralized database for simplified management. RADIUS is a standard published in RFC2138.

 

2. The PAP protocol transmits your logon credentials as cleat text.

Explanation: PAP is short for Password Authentication Protocol, the most basic form of authentication, in which a user's name and password are transmitted over a network and compared to a table of name-password pairs. Typically, the passwords stored in the table are encrypted. The Basic Authentication feature built into the HTTP protocol uses PAP. The main weakness of PAP is that both the username and password are transmitted "in clear text" -- that is, in an unencrypted form. Contrast this with CHAP, which uses challenges rather than cleartext password transmissions.

 

3. To protect an organizational directory from unauthorized changes you would select SSL or TLS .

Explanation: Directory changes need to be protected from unauthorized changes. Use SSL or TLS to make changes to any LDAP type directory.

 

4. A Blind FTP server does not reveal directory or content data .

Explanation: A blind FTP requires that a user know both the directory required and the filename(s). It can be set up in the UNIX environment with directory permissions set to 333 (write and execute for owner/group/world).

 

5. WEP can be compromised by Airsnort .

Explanation: "AirSnort131 is a wireless LAN (WLAN) tool which recovers encryption keys. AirSnort operates by passively monitoring transmissions, and computing the encryption key when enough packets have been gathered."


 __________________

131. http://airsnort.shmoo.com/

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