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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Security+
 9  Chapter 2:  Communication Security (Domain 2.0; 20%)
      9  2.6  Wireless

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2.6  Wireless
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2.6.2  802.11x
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2.6.1  WTLS

The Wireless Application Protocol is another wireless technology that was created for wireless resources with limited capability such as a cellular phone. Among the protocols within WAP is the security layer, Wireless Transport Layer Security (WTLS), which provides privacy, data integrity and authentication for WAP communication. It is an evolution of the TLS/SSL protocols specifically suited for the low-bandwidth, high-latency, less robust, wireless scenario. It uses both conventional symmetric and public key cryptography.

As pointed out by Markku-Juhani Saarinen232 at the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland the WTLS protocol design limits the effectiveness a Certificate Authority such as VeriSign can have while supporting WTLS. It appears that this research has been taken to heart as seen in the papers available from the wapforum.org233. If you visit the site you may notice the group is in the process of quietly renaming itself to the Open Mobile Alliance.

WAP/WTLS

WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) is a protocol for communication between low-bandwidth, high-latency wireless devices.

WTLS (Wireless Transport Layer Security) is the WAP security protocol that provides privacy, data integrity and authentication for WAP communication.


[spacer]Better Wireless Security234

The Wi-Fi Alliance's specification, called WPA (Wireless Protected Access), includes mechanisms from the emerging 802.11i standard for both data and network access control. For encryption, WPA has TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol), which uses the same algorithm as WEP but constructs keys in a different way. For access control, WPA will use the IEEE 802.1X protocol, a recently completed standard for controlling entry to both wired and wireless LANs.

With WPA, each user will have his or her own encryption key, and that key can be set to change periodically. In enterprises, user authentication will be handled by an authentication, a system that can be expanded to handle more users much more easily than could WEP.

In the future some enterprising firm may use digital infrared
235 for short range communication.



 __________________

232. http://www.cc.jyu.fi/~mjos/wtls.pdf

233. http://www.wapforum.org/what/technical.htm

234. http://www.infoworld.com/articles/hn/xml/02/10/31/021031hnwifi.xml?s=IDGNS

235. http://www.sony.net/Products/SC-HP/cx_news/vol27/pdf/diat.pdf

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