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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Security+
 9  Chapter 0:  Read.Me

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0.2  Hacker vs. Cracker
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0.4  Security Checklist
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0.3  Security Tao

Tao is a term that generally means that the subtle reality of the universe cannot be described. While choosing the word Tao would seem to suggest it is not possible to describe security, our goal is to give you an outline on the general ‘how’ of security, without pretending to say, ‘step by step, here are all of your answers.

In simpler times of living in a non-computerized domain, the number one challenge was physical security. There was no computer called the domain controller, or network cable to defeat. A person defeating domain security would be destroying his own family and possessions, effectively reducing the threat. This allowed physical security to be evaluated to a high science. Without boring you with details, such as the openings in the walls that were slanted to deflect incoming arrows, let’s look at the logistics of protecting a village. The basic plans are the same today.

Villagers would work outside the castle walls in fields. The castle had watchtowers placed so a complete view of any possible threat could be observed, while allowing for preparation time. When a watchtower sounded an alarm, the villagers would retreat behind the castle walls, the drawbridge was raised and defensive counter measures were lit up (often literally).

Defenders with long bows had the advantages of height and protection from the castle walls. They would begin by sending arrows out in an attempt to break the solid front of the attackers. If there were dry fields between the opposing factions, the arrows would be on fire, to create a ‘wall of fire’ (firewall) causing further delay and damage to the attacker.

Assuming this was a serious attack, the defenders would then pour hot oil on the advancing attackers from atop the castle walls. Catapults would be used to throw rocks and/or fireballs at the rear of the attacking force destroying supplies.

With proper planning, a castle would have stores of supplies to outlast a siege (blockade) while the opposing force had no practical method to penetrate the castle walls.

The elements briefly described here demonstrate a defensive system that while old is still effective. It is known as a zone of security. Zones of security offer a defensive point while buying time to either start heating up oil to pour on the attackers or to page an administrator to begin counter measures. Another common element is that zones of security start out as simple physical/psychological barriers, and eventually end up including more hardened elements.

Today, you may find concrete barriers preventing parking within a given distance of an airport functioning as the outside perimeter. The closer in you come to the airport, you find closed circuit TV and police.

Move to the inside of a terminal and you find in addition to the closed circuit TV and police, plain clothes (undercover) security forces, along with inspections. This is a modern day example of zones of security.

Zones of security are not limited to physical attributes. This concept can and should be applied to all forms of security.


Previous Topic/Section
0.2  Hacker vs. Cracker
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
0.4  Security Checklist
Next Topic/Section

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