Like this CertiGuide? Get it in PDF format!
Click Here!
Use coupon code "certiguide" to save 20%!
(Expires 2004/12/31)

NEW! Network+ N11-003 2005 Beta Exam Study Guide - Just $9!
Get It Here!

Custom Search







Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Network+
 9  Chapter 0100:  Network Protocols

Previous Topic/Section
Pop Quiz 0100.00
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
Next Page
VIII  Routing Protocols
Next Topic/Section

VII  TCP/IP
(Page 1 of 2)

The TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) suite of protocols and utilities is so vast; you can stock a small library on the topic. For the purposes of the NETWORK+ test you are expected to know the TCP/IP suite.

Since the TCP/IP suite works across a huge variety of systems, it is rapidly becoming THE protocol suite for everyday use. With this in mind, you are encouraged to continue your studies of this suite beyond preparing for the NETWORK+ test.

In the next chapter, we’ll dig into the details of TCP/IP. For now, let’s look at an overview of the TCP/IP suite. As with the other protocol families we’ve examined in this chapter, the TCP/IP protocol suite consists of multiple protocols, which operate at various layers of the OSI Model.

OSI 7 Layer Model

Most reference guides to TCP/IP use the Department Of Defense network model that is a 4-layer model. The
NETWORK+ test uses the OSI seven layer network model to categorize the TCP/IP protocols.


Following the transportation theme of the other protocols we’ve described, TCP/IP is like a tractor-trailer. Capable of hauling almost anything, almost anywhere, it is also the slowest of the protocols and requires the most knowledge to configure and maintain.

It is also the most configurable. The fact that this protocol has the most overhead has become a non-issue with delivery of more powerful computers and faster physical network technologies like Gigabit Ethernet.

The TCP/IP suite has always enjoyed life in UNIX. Windows NT 4.0 and all later releases of Windows have TCP/IP capabilities and beginning with Netware 5.0, Novell is supporting this protocol directly and natively. Prior to Netware 5.0, IP was enclosed inside of IPX when needed.

Using the OSI layering model, each layer has a specific function to accomplish. It then hands off to the next layer up or down, depending on traffic flow of data out from the computer to the network or data in from the network to the computer.


Previous Topic/Section
Pop Quiz 0100.00
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
2
Next Page
VIII  Routing Protocols
Next Topic/Section

If you find CertiGuide.com useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) In lieu of a larger donation, you may wish to consider buying an inexpensive PDF equivalent of the CertiGuide to Network+ from StudyExam4Less.com. (Use coupon code "certiguide" by December 31, 2004 to save 20%!) Thanks for your support!
Donate $2
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

CertiGuide for Network+ (http://www.CertiGuide.com/netplus/) on CertiGuide.com
Version 1.0 - Version Date: November 7, 2004

Adapted with permission from a work created by Tcat Houser and Helen O’Boyle.
CertiGuide.com Version © Copyright 2004 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.