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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Network+
 9  Chapter 0111: Wide Area Networking

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Packet Switching vs. Circuit-Switching
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IX  Test 0111:  Success Questions
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VIII  Chapter 0111: Summary

In this chapter, you learned about ways to connect networks (or end users’ computers) to networks across distances greater than those permitted by LAN’s.

First, we looked at types of wide area networking often used by individuals. Remote Access technology allows users to access LAN resources from remote locations. One form provides the user with access to their actual LAN PC desktop across a WAN link, using Microsoft Terminal Services or Citrix MetaFrame.

For corporate remote access and general Internet access, individual users will often use a low-speed dial-up technology such as POTS (traditional phone line) or ISDN (digital Telco line). When using POTS, the user must connect their computer to a modem, and then connect a phone line to the modem.

Remote access protocols include SLIP, PPP, PPTP, L2TP. SLIP and PPP implement TCP/IP over a dial-up connection. PPP supports TCP/IP and other protocols as well. PPTP and L2TP add an encrypted VPN tunnel, for added security.

Next, we looked at high-speed access technologies for end users, including DSL and cable Internet. We discussed the different kinds of DSL, and compared DSL and cable Internet. Sometimes ISP’s find it advantageous to make these usually dedicated technologies look like the older dial-up technologies. To do this, they use PPPoE.

Then, we looked at high speed network-to-network connectivity technologies. We looked at analog and digital leased lines, including T1/T3, E1/E3, and OCn speed lines, listing their speeds. We also looked at X.25, Frame Relay and ATM non-point-to-point networking.

Finally, we compared packet switching and circuit switching.


Previous Topic/Section
Packet Switching vs. Circuit-Switching
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
IX  Test 0111:  Success Questions
Next Topic/Section

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