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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Network+
 9  Chapter 0110: Network Operating Systems (NOS)

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Linux Printing, Client Connectivity
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VIII  Print Server
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VII  Apple Macintosh

Apple Macintosh is not considered (by most, anyway) to be a true NOS in the same vein as Windows NT, Novell NetWare and Linux. It lacks many of the tools and enterprise-oriented functionality present in those other operating systems more commonly found as servers in an enterprise-wide client/server environment.

However, many Apple Macintosh systems are in use as workgroup servers, and networked Macintosh computer users often share files and printers with each other on a peer-to-peer basis.

It’s a common occurrence for the coolest color graphics printer in the department to be connected to the resident graphics wizard’s Mac, and for users to need access to that printer occasionally from their Windows computers, so Windows includes the ability to do so, through File Server for Macintosh which is included when AppleTalk is installed on a Windows 2000 Server.

Print to AppleTalk Printer from Windows

To print to a Macintosh AppleTalk printer from Windows you use the Add Printer wizard, select Local Printer, AppleTalk Printing devices and then select from the list, the name of the printer and the server to which it is connected. Yes, you add a local rather than network printer, because a network printer is specifically one shared using Windows File and Printer sharing.


If you don’t see the AppleTalk Printing devices option, install the AppleTalk protocol on your Windows client computer, from your Windows installation CD, so that the AppleTalk protocol and AppleTalk Printing devices become available.

Similarly, a Macintosh client user may occasionally want to use the high-speed printer connected to a Windows 2000 server in the corporate IT department. This is accomplished by installing AppleTalk on the Windows 2000 server, which includes the Print Server for Macintosh feature. This allows Apple clients to print to Windows printers.

[spacer]Mac does print protocol conversions

An interesting feature of Print Server for Macintosh is that it automatically translates print files from the Postscript print language which is the native Macintosh print file format, into the format required by the selected Windows printer – which might be Postscript, or might be another format like HP PCL, the language most often used by HP Laserjets. Alas, Windows client users can’t use this as an easy way to print Postscript files to non-Postscript printers like most HP Laserjets – this functionality is only available when printing from Macintosh clients.



Previous Topic/Section
Linux Printing, Client Connectivity
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
VIII  Print Server
Next Topic/Section

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