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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Network+
 9  Chapter 0110: Network Operating Systems (NOS)
      9  VI  Linux

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Linux (UNIX) File Permissions
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Linux Printing, Client Connectivity
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Linux File Sharing, Client Connectivity

You may need to be aware of how to access network-shared files in a Linux network for the Network+ exam.

By default, Linux uses the standard UNIX file-sharing protocol NFS (Network File System, developed by Sun Microsystems) for its file sharing activities. Client Linux machines can connect to network file resources by using the mount command from the client’s command line, specifying –tnfs, to tell Linux to look for a network file share by that name, as in:

mount –tnfs my.srv.com:/shareddir /mnt

This will provide access to the shared resources “shareddir” on the server my.srv.com, for the local computer.

To share files between a Linux machine and a Windows machine, you must either install Samba on the Linux box (which allows the Linux box to speak the Windows File Sharing protocol), or install NFS on the Windows box (which allows the Windows box to speak the NFS protocol).

[spacer]Multiple NIC cards

Multiple ISA based NICs can be configured by using the following lines in the /etc/conf.modules file:

alias eth0 ne

alias eth1 ne

Use PCI

Use PCI NICs

PCI has been available long enough to not waste time/energy on an ISA card for any O/S. Use PCI wherever possible.

If you didn’t take the advice to use PCI use:

netconf
command for old hardware

It is common to see old hardware getting new life as a proxy server or firewall using LINUX. As we mentioned earlier in discussing what an IP Proxy server is, this typically means two more NICs are installed in the old box. If the O/S is not seeing both eth0 and eth1, use netconf from a command line, selecting the “enabled” box in the device tab and configure each card separately.


ifconfig

To set up a NIC from the command line in Linux, use the ifconfig command. ifconfig is also used in Linux (and UNIX) environments to display information about a network interface (such as IP address, subnet mask, etc.), similar to ipconfig or winipcfg in a Windows environment

Do not confuse ifconfig with the Windows command IPCONFIG, which displays TCP/IP configuration information.



Previous Topic/Section
Linux (UNIX) File Permissions
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
Linux Printing, Client Connectivity
Next Topic/Section

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