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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Network+
 9  Chapter 0111: Wide Area Networking

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I  Concepts & Terms Required - Chapter 0111
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III  Individual Dial Up Remote Access
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II  Remote Access

Remote access is now a standard computing activity for a corporation’s ‘road warrior’ employees as well as the SOHO (Small Office Home Office). Why?

Just as many corporate staff can’t go anywhere without their cell phone, many need access to their email from almost any location at almost any time. Also many benefit from access to their corporate intranet applications such as inventory tracking programs as well as product documentation. Companies are increasingly making their business applications and data available over the web, just like many Internet applications (shopping carts and product catalogs at e-commerce sites, for example). The stage has been set to make the browser the default interface, eliminating the choice of the operating system of the computer or terminal. Also, as higher speed remote access technologies become available, users are taking advantage of “remote desktop” services that let them access their office PC from the road or home.

Remote Support

Microsoft and third parties offer software that provides “remote desktop” services, allowing one or more users to connect to a computer without being physically seated in front of it. These protocols can be used across any TCP/IP network connection, not only across dial-up connections.

Microsoft’s offering is called Terminal Services, as previously mentioned. It can use either the RDP (Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Protocol) or ICA (Independent Computing Architecture) protocols to communicate keystrokes and mouse clicks from the remote client to the server, and screen responses from the server to the client.

Its primary competitor is Citrix MetaFrame, which uses the ICA protocol (developed by Citrix).


Also, in the past 5 years, Internet access has become a more and more desirable commodity to consumers, opening up a new market for Internet Service Providers. These organizations purchase high-bandwidth WAN lines to the Internet and are in the business of reselling access and support services to consumers and businesses.

The Internet has changed the way the world communicates and with this, the concepts of distance and time. Communications companies are battling for clients across industries previously separated from each other, such as, Cable and Phone companies. We’ll see this when we look at remote access alternatives.


Previous Topic/Section
I  Concepts & Terms Required - Chapter 0111
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
III  Individual Dial Up Remote Access
Next Topic/Section

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