Like what you see? Get it in one document for easy printing!
Click Here!
Use coupon code "certiguide" to save 20%!
(Expires 2004/12/31)

NEW! Network+ N11-003 2005 Beta Exam Study Guide - Just $9!
Get It Here!

Custom Search







Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Network+
 9  Chapter 0001:  LAN Cabling

Previous Topic/Section
I  Concepts & Terms Required - Chapter 0001
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
III  Legacy Cable / Physical Topologies
Next Topic/Section

II  Connections

In order for the hosts on a network to communicate with each other, they must be connected somehow. This connectivity can be accomplished via wire (cabling) or wireless technology, which is becoming more popular in recent years. Many factors come into play when considering how to physically connect the hosts, sometimes called stations or nodes, in a local area network. For example, a site may have existing (legacy) cabling already installed which must be taken into consideration when expanding.

When installing a new network, always keep in mind that cabling is the least frequently upgraded (upwards of 10 to 20 years) network component. Future upgrade ability requires that cable with the best quality and throughput available be selected when installing a new network. If you merely meet today’s requirements (or yesterday’s), then you may find your upgrade options limited in the near future unless you’re willing to replace that cable.

There are three primary families of cabling used in Local Area Network (LAN) environments. These are:

  1. Coax

  2. Twisted Pair

  3. Fiber-Optic

They are differentiated by physical characteristics, the electrical technologies used to transmit data, and by the maximum speed at which data can travel on the wire. In this chapter, we’ll discuss the cable standards most often used with networks based on the two most popular LAN standards, Ethernet and IBM Token Ring. Ethernet is the most widely used technology for LAN’s – when discussing physical network components like cabling and the various devices that connect to the network, unless we specifically mention Token Ring, we’re describing components that are typically part of an Ethernet network.

Networks can also be connected with wireless technology. We’ll review the latest standards in that area as well.

Finally, we’ll wrap up by looking at some of the real-world details that are important when installing cabling and connecting workstations to a network.


Previous Topic/Section
I  Concepts & Terms Required - Chapter 0001
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
III  Legacy Cable / Physical Topologies
Next Topic/Section

If you find CertiGuide.com useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) In lieu of a larger donation, you may wish to consider buying an inexpensive PDF equivalent of the CertiGuide to Network+ from StudyExam4Less.com. (Use coupon code "certiguide" by December 31, 2004 to save 20%!) Thanks for your support!
Donate $2
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

CertiGuide for Network+ (http://www.CertiGuide.com/netplus/) on CertiGuide.com
Version 1.0 - Version Date: November 7, 2004

Adapted with permission from a work created by Tcat Houser and Helen O’Boyle.
CertiGuide.com Version © Copyright 2004 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.