Read this whole guide offline with no ads, for a very low price!
Click Here!
Use coupon code "certiguide" to save 20%!
(Expires 2004/12/31)

NEW! Network+ N11-003 2005 Beta Exam Study Guide - Just $9!
Get It Here!

Custom Search







Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Network+
 9  Chapter 0111: Wide Area Networking
      9  V  High-Bandwidth Individual Remote Access

Previous Topic/Section
Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
VI  TCP/IP Encapsulation for High-Speed Internet Connections
Next Topic/Section

Cable Internet

Not to be left behind, the cable companies have an answer for users wishing high-speed Internet access as well. A number of cable companies, typically larger ones, offer users in some areas access to the Internet via your cable TV connection.

To enable this, you use a hardware device known as a “cable modem” to interface between the coax for your cable service, and your PC (or network router).

In general, cable speeds are roughly comparable to DSL speeds – they’re both “really fast” consumer Internet access options. One advantage cable Internet has over DSL is that there’s no distance limitation beyond the presence of the cable company’s wire into your house.

If it’s there and the company offers cable Internet access in your area, you can probably subscribe to it, with none of the mystery often surrounding DSL eligibility.

Another difference between cable Internet and DSL is in the speeds you can expect when your neighbors on cable or DSL Internet connections are heavily using the network. Once you subscribe to DSL at a certain speed, you’re likely to always get that speed, no matter how many of your DSL-equipped neighbors are also downloading huge movie trailers from the Internet at the same time. With cable Internet, however, the more users who are downloading those movie trailers and sending huge archives of pictures to Grandma, the slower your connection speed becomes, because you’re sharing the cable’s actual wire in your neighborhood with all your neighbors.

[spacer]Goodbye

One hint as to the early stages of these markets is that as of late 2001, early 2002, a bit of consolidation is occurring in the cable Internet world. Excite@Home exited the cable Internet business and its customers are picked up by AT&T and other carriers. This has caused a bit of commotion, as thousands of users found themselves temporarily without Internet access while they were between carriers. Situations like this are not unheard of in the DSL world, either. In the past year, one major nationwide player (Covad) went away, and others, like Qwest, are getting out of the DSL ISP business and sending their customers to other providers.


[spacer]Alternatives vie against DSL and Cable

In addition to DSL and Cable Internet connectivity, other higher-speed technologies are beginning to enjoy popularity.

Satellite TV companies are providing Satellite Internet access. Any location that has line-of-sight to the satellite can use this technology, thus making it available to many users who don’t have DSL or cable modem access. A downside to satellite Internet connectivity is the 2-second lag in transmission between the Internet and the client PC, as the signal is bounced up to the satellite and back to earth.

Wireless networking often provides speeds as fast as, or faster than, cable Internet or DSL. Some metropolitan areas have begun public, or semi-public wireless networking efforts, sharing a high-capacity Internet line with a neighborhood or region by placing Wireless Access Points and antennas around where those with 802.11 cards in their notebooks and PDA’s can access the Internet at “LAN speeds”.



Previous Topic/Section
Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
VI  TCP/IP Encapsulation for High-Speed Internet Connections
Next Topic/Section

If you find CertiGuide.com useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) In lieu of a larger donation, you may wish to consider buying an inexpensive PDF equivalent of the CertiGuide to Network+ from StudyExam4Less.com. (Use coupon code "certiguide" by December 31, 2004 to save 20%!) Thanks for your support!
Donate $2
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

CertiGuide for Network+ (http://www.CertiGuide.com/netplus/) on CertiGuide.com
Version 1.0 - Version Date: November 7, 2004

Adapted with permission from a work created by Tcat Houser and Helen O’Boyle.
CertiGuide.com Version © Copyright 2004 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.