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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to Network+
 9  Chapter 0101:  TCP/IP
      9  X  TCP/IP Configuration

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DHCP
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XI  TCP/IP Network Diagnostic Utilities
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BOOTP

BOOTP (Boot Protocol) is an older method for obtaining an IP address. Only one DHCP server is required even if the network has separate physical subnets as long as the routers connecting those separate networks or subnets have BOOTP compatibility. BOOTP is not as flexible as DHCP. Its limitations, along with Microsoft throwing its weight behind DHCP rather than BOOTP, have relegated BOOTP to the background.

If there is no DHCP or BOOTP server on the local network, and there is a non-BOOTP-compatible router between the client and the nearest DHCP server, then the client won’t be able to retrieve its configuration information. This means that the client may be unable to do one or more of the following: access other computers on the same subnet via name or IP address, access hosts on the Internet by name or IP address, access hosts on other subnets by name or IP address.

WINS & DHCP

NETBIOS over TCP/IP uses WINS.

A DHCP server must have a static address.


Since the IP address is loaned, it is not a permanent deal. The IP number is released upon shutting down the client computer, or if it is unused, when the lease expires. Leases automatically renew if the client has been connected and actually using the loaned IP number. Typical lease renewals start at halfway through the lease period.

Dynamic Host Addresses

One downside to dynamic host addresses is that users expect web sites to be at static addresses, rather than at addresses that change every time the web server is rebooted. For this reason, web servers (and other servers offering services to the Internet population at large) are often given static addresses.


Oh, so you’re on your ISP’s network and you can’t get a static address? There are ways around this, which involve updating a record listing your host name and its current IP address, so that others can find you no matter what IP address you are handed, but they’re beyond the scope of Network+.


Previous Topic/Section
DHCP
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
XI  TCP/IP Network Diagnostic Utilities
Next Topic/Section

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