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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (Operating Systems)
 9  Chapter 0000:  How to Get There
      9  V  Desktop Navigation

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Windows Menus and Dialog Boxes

In Windows there are many submenus and commands, designed for increased functionality.

You can click on the title bar of the window itself, which is the section at the very top of the Window. It’s usually one row high and dark blue, to differentiate it from the rest of the window, unless the user has changed their Windows desktop color scheme. Below that is the menu bar which lists various submenus of functions you can access, such as File, Edit, View, Window and Help.

An underlined letter on a menu bar denotes the keyboard shortcut for the menu. To use a keyboard shortcut to bring up a menu, hold down the ALT key and press the underlined letter. For example, the “File” menu in many programs is accessed by holding down ALT, pressing the F key, and then releasing ALT. Also, an underlined letter on a menu option denotes the keyboard shortcut for that menu item. You may also see a combination next to the menu item consisting of keys on the keyboard that are pressed in combination to access the selected (highlighted) item on the menu. The SHIFT, ALT and CTRL keys can be held down while pressing other keys such as F4, to access different functions. Refer back to our shortcut key chart regarding functions you can access by pressing multiple keys.

Notice the menu of the screen shot of this work in progress, where right-clicking on the top (above the menu bar) of the open window produced a context menu that offers the ALT + F4 choice (Figure 24).


Figure 24: Sent To Option

 


Also notice that there are icons beside Restore and Minimize to remind you how to manipulate the open window, in addition to the underlined command (control) letters to be used with the ALT key or in some cases the SHIFT key. The + sign in between the ALT and F4 keys means to press F4 while holding down the ALT key. Grayed out areas mean that the option is not currently available in the menu.

The menus and shortcut keys that are available depend on the application being run. For example, the screen shot above shows the menus available in Microsoft Word. Refer to the help file in the application or for Windows commands use the Windows help file for information on keyboard shortcuts. Most applications have File, Edit and Help menus, with contents appropriate to the application. The other top-level menus vary depending on what the application does and how one uses it.

Notice that the Restore command is bolded (available) and the R is underlined. The Close command is also bolded and the C is underlined and also offers the option of using the ALT + F4 key to close the window.

Notice also that the Close command has an X beside it. This reminds you that you can close the window by clicking the X at the right hand top corner of the window, with your mouse.


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