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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (Operating Systems)
 9  Chapter 0001:  File Structure
      9  III  Drive Converter

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Using Drive Converter (FAT32)
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NTFS5
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NTFS4

The New Technology File System (NTFS) is the child of HPFS (High Performance File System) that was born with OS/2 Lan Man.

The last O/S that supported HPFS was NT 3.51. Beginning with NT 4, it was possible to convert to NTFS from either FAT 16 or HPFS. It could not create a HPFS volume.

NT4 can create a FAT 16 volume, (up to 4 GB ), since it doesn't need FDISK. Frequently, you will see NTFS4 referred to simply as NTFS. The 4 got hung on the end with Windows 2000, when a new and improved version of NTFS was introduced in Windows 2000.

There are a great many features of NTFS that give good reasons to use this over FAT. File integrity is greatly increased, and guarding against a flaky hard drive may be a great reason for choosing NTFS over FAT anything.

NTFS File Structure Support

NTFS 4 supports FAT 16, NTFS 4 and CDFS.

Another reason for the existence of NTFS is the ability to hold on to more than the 4 file attributes available in FAT (archive, hidden, system, read-only). NTFS has a greatly expanded indexing system, which allows for security attributes to be attached to each file. This can protect sensitive data from prying eyes, if the users login access does not allow reading of the file, they cannot read the file.

The down side to all this extra stuff is the indexing system (called the Master File Table or MFT) is so huge, it cannot fit on a 1.44 MB floppy.

Lost and Restored

Should files be backed up (saved) from NTFS and restored to a FAT based drive, the extra data, such as; security information is lost. Only the 4 file attributes and long file names will be transferred.

NTFS Features

NTFS 4 allows for compression of data at the volume, directory or file level.



Previous Topic/Section
Using Drive Converter (FAT32)
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NTFS5
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