Read this whole guide offline with no ads, for a very low price!
Click Here!
Use coupon code "SAVE50" to get it half price!

Custom Search







Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (Operating Systems)
 9  Chapter 0000:  How to Get There

Previous Topic/Section
Pop Quiz 0000.00
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
Mouse Clicks
Next Topic/Section

IV  Windows, Mice and Keyboards

Our primary focus in this chapter will be on navigating around the most common GUI interface, referred to as a Window.

Windows or rectangles of information display areas, open up in the Windows family of Operating Systems, when we are accessing information or even when we receive an error message. We need to understand how to resize, open, close, and move these windows to increase our functionality and navigational ability in the Windows Operating Systems.

At the upper right hand corner of every window, you will see three small squares, called buttons, which always appear in the same order, as shown in Figure 7.


Figure 7: Standard Windows buttons: Maximize, Minimize, Restore and Close

 


The 3 small squares are navigational keys to managing a window. If you lose track of which button does what, you can always move your mouse pointer over each button, and hold it there for a few seconds. This will cause windows to display a Tool Tip describing that button’s function, to jog your memory.

The square with the small horizontal line is used to minimize a window, temporarily removing it from the main desktop, but leaving it accessible via the tool bar at the bottom of the screen. (Minimize appears). The square with two overlapping squares is used to restore a window to its original size and position. (Restore appears). The large square is used to maximize a window, making it take up the full screen (Maximize appears). The “X” square is used to close a window, which ends the program. (Close appears).

Looking very closely at the screen shots above, you can see that the middle button sometimes displays a picture of a single square, for the maximize action, and sometimes a picture of two squares, for the restore action. Why did Microsoft use the same buttons for two different actions? Because if a window is already maximized, taking up the full screen, it doesn’t make sense to maximize it again… but it does make sense to restore it to its smaller size. And if a window is already small, taking up only part of the screen, restoring it to the same size and position doesn’t make sense… but enlarging it to full-screen with the maximize function does.

[spacer]Cursor Help

When the cursor is held over one of the options a small window will pop up and tell you what the function is.

The information that pops up is called a Tool Tip. This works for many function buttons in Windows programs, like Internet Explorer and Microsoft Word.


Figure 8: Windows Explorer open window.

 


There can be many windows open at the same time. We will show you how as we get further along. First we need to understand how to navigate Windows with the keyboard and mouse.

Quick navigation to subsections and regular topics in this section



Previous Topic/Section
Pop Quiz 0000.00
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
Mouse Clicks
Next Topic/Section

If you find CertiGuide.com useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) In lieu of a larger donation, you may wish to consider buying an inexpensive PDF equivalent of the CertiGuide to A+ (Operating Systems) from StudyExam4Less.com. (Use coupon code "SAVE50" to save a full 50% off the already low price!) Thanks for your support!
Donate $2
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

CertiGuide to A+ (Operating Systems) (http://www.CertiGuide.com/apluso/) on CertiGuide.com
Version 1.0 - Version Date: January 7, 2005

Adapted with permission from a work created by Tcat Houser.
CertiGuide.com Version Copyright 2005 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.