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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (Core Hardware)
 9  Chapter 1011:  Networking
      9  VI  Cables and Wireless

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VI  Cables and Wireless
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Thinnet

The first option to appear that didn't involve wrestling and building upper body strength faster than a Bow flex exercise machine was a thinner version of the frozen garden hose, called Thinnet.

Still a copper core and with a plastic cladding, then the metal braided sheath to control interference, coated with a plastic wrapper. Only this entry was as thin as the cable for TV. They look identical, and the only difference is the Ohm ratings.

TV is 75 Ohm, while thinnet is 50 Ohm. Thinnet is called RG-58 U and it even comes in a version known as RG-58 AU, which has a braided copper center instead of the solid copper center found in RG-58 U.

[spacer]RG-58U vs. RG-58AU

Never mix RG-58 U and RG-58 AU. As the frequency of a signal increases, electrons have a tendency to 'surf' the edge of the copper. Since RG-58 AU has more surface area than RG-58 U, a 'traffic jam' occurs at the junction point, which causes a reflection of some of the signal, creating noise out of your Ethernet signal.


Regardless of the use of RG-58 U or RG-58 AU, the maximum length is 185 meters (or about 200 yards).

The connectors are much more benign, and are called BNC. Because of the debate over what exactly BNC means, it is not identified here.

Figure 104: BNC on a NIC.

 


When using Thinnet, each BNC is attached to a 'T' type device with the cable crossing the top of the T. The base is used to connect to the NIC in the PC. This creates one long continuous segment, known as a backbone.

[spacer]Removing a PC from a Network

When removing a PC from a network that uses Thinnet, NEVER remove the cable from the BNC 'T'. ALWAYS remove the base of the 'T' from the PC. If you remove the cable, you 'break' the backbone, and the entire network goes down.



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