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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (Core Hardware)
 9  Chapter 0000:  The Start of the PC

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I  Introduction to Chapter 0000
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II  Start of IT and the History of Computing

If you are very familiar with PC’s (personal computers) you can safely skip the history lesson. Fair warning that skipping yesteryear data will deprive you of the data for some fun bets you are sure to win (unless the opposing party has also read this book J.

Data you really need to know begins with the Success Owl regarding 8-bit vs. 16-bit data paths. If that sounds like Greek to you, then it is important to read the history lesson.

You will learn the different ways computer manufactures offered expansion capabilities to their hardware.

After examining the sub systems that are the parts of the PC you will learn the principles of electricity. Building on your newfound understanding of electricity, you will discover how electronic components behave and how to visually Identify them. Visual explanations augment the discussion.

Finally, you will garner an understanding of how Base2 (binary) math relates to both Base10 (everyday math) and Base16 (hex) math, without needing to be a ‘propeller head’.

[spacer]IT Starts

Many consider the first computer to be an invention by the American known as Herman Hollerith. This machine read punch cards, to tie the latest statistics for the 1890 census. (He got the idea from his brother back in Europe, when reading his letter about the new weaving looms operated.) Hollerith sold the US Congress on the idea. (Computing first vaporware product) The 1890 Census was completely done in months, not years. And distilling data such as “how many wheat farmers live in Ohio?” became feasible. Hollerith was a smash hit. Later, financial difficulties forced the sale of this machine to a firm known as Computer Tabulating Recording (CTR). A former salesman of player pianos at the time was Thomas Watson, who was working with CTR. Eventually, Watson took over the company, renaming it IBM.


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I  Introduction to Chapter 0000
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