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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (Core Hardware)
 9  Chapter 0010:  CPUs
      9  VIII  Sockets & Slots

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VIII  Sockets & Slots
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Early Sockets

Beginning with the 80486 a rectangular socket with 169 pins ultimately became known as Socket 1.

[spacer]80486 CPU’s and 168 Pins

The very first 486 systemboards had 168 pins.

Socket 1 was derived from the OverDrive chip.


Socket 2 involved 238 pins and was intended to support the Pentium OverDrive CPU.

Socket 3 was the last of the production 80486 sockets. Added the ability to support 3.3 Volt CPUs. 237 pins.

Socket 4 was first Pentium socket and the only one to support 5 Volts. P60 and P66 only.

Socket 5 was for the Pentium 75 to 133Mhz. 320 pins, and the first socket that staggered the pins.

Socket 6 was the last official 486 socket, for the DX4. Using 3.3 Volts and 235 pins.

Socket 7 supported the Pentium 75 up to 500Mhz (K-6). It was the first to incorporate voltage regulation for less than 3.3 Volts. 321 pins.

[spacer]Don’t Smoke that CPU

Prior to Socket 5, inserting a CPU into a socket without carefully observing the orientation of Pin 1 and powering up would instantly destroy the CPU. Typically, the system board as well since the pins would de-solder themselves from the package holding the CPU, leaving the now burnt pins inside the socket.


Figure 37: Socket 7 with ZIF lever opening pins. Closing the lever slides the socket closed, locking the CPU in place. The plastic tabs on the edges are to hold a CPU cooling fan.

 


Figure 38: Pentium Pro Socket 8 is a contender for the largest socket based CPU ever made.

 


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