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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (A+ 4 Real)
 9  Chapter 12: Material Safety: a Personal and Technical Report on Hazardous Material Handling
      9  Reading and Understanding MSDSs

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Section Eleven - Environmental / Regulatory Data
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Section Twelve - Other Information

Figure 421: MSDS Section Twelve: Other Information

 


This section is the junk drawer of MSDSs, it hold everything that just does not seem to fit anywhere else. In this MSDS, I placed the list of definitions and the disclaimer in this section.

The list of definitions usually gives the meaning of the acronyms, technical terms and other objects that the reader may not readily understand. It is a nice feature and it is a shame that many MSDSs do not include it. So, let me explain why I put only two items in the list of definitions. I saw that I getting near the end of the page and, as I did not want to start another page I still had to fit in the disclaimer and I decided to cut that one short. It’s okay though, as I knew I would be explaining all those terms and acronyms in this writing.

I actually remember a time when MSDSs did not have disclaimers. Someone, probably a lawyer, said that just would not be complete without it and there you have it, disclaimers of the yin yang. Most disclaimers state that the information provided is believed to be accurate and complete, however they cannot be held responsible for inaccurate and omitted information.

Some even go as far stating that the user (you and your employer) has the responsibly to verify the information the information contain in the MSDS, something that I believe the Hazard Communication Standard disagrees with. I am particular troubled with this kind of responsibility shifting when the MSDS lists trade secrets. How do you verify that the information is correct when you do not know what substances are in the product? Fortunately, such disclaimers are not common.

 

Another common topic in the disclaimer is the user‘s responsibility to read the product labels, follow any usage instruction, the MSDS and use the product in a proper manner. In addition, the user should consistently check for and update MSDSs. I can find no argument with any of these concepts, as it is good advice.

In my disclaimer, I state that is it the responsibility of the user to read the MSDS. Hmm, if you are someone who regularly reads the MSDS, such a statement is probably not necessary and if you’re someone who never reads them, then it’s of little practical use besides limiting Tcat’s and my liability.

All and all, for good, bad or indifference and much like the infamous End User License Agreement (EULA) of the software world, disclaimers are here to stay and are bound to grow it their content and denials. Moreover, as with the EULA, very few people will actually read them.


Previous Topic/Section
Section Eleven - Environmental / Regulatory Data
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
Some Ending Notes
Next Topic/Section

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