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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (A+ 4 Real)
 9  Chapter 1: What are Operating Systems and How Do They Work?
      9  File Structure
           9  Partitioning, Formatting and File Systems

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NTFS v4
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HPFS
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NTFS v5

Without tangible reasons to spend money, few would upgrade the operating system just because something was new. Microsoft gave a great many reasons to upgrade to Windows 2000 and NTFS 5. Beyond the features of NTFS 4, Microsoft created the concept of the dynamic disk.

A dynamic disk is a versatile way of using storage space to expand the operating system features. The two major features of dynamic disks are the ability to present smaller pieces of space from multiple disks as a single disk, and to mount disks as sub folders. Mounting disks as sub folders is actually an extremely powerful and useful ability. Consider the situation where a user stores extremely large PowerPoint presentations in the C:\Presentations folder. When the C disk is full, the user must either delete some files or begin storing them elsewhere. Keeping files in two different locations is inconvenient and difficult to manage, and is the ideal situation for a dynamic disk. A new 100-gigabyte disk could be mounted as C:\Presentations\2004, and the user can transparently continue to save their data into the same folder.

The “opposite” of a dynamic disk – one that is configured in the normal manner – is called a “basic” disk.

NTFS 5 supports all the features of NTFS 4 and on top adds the ability to encrypt data at the volume, directory or file level. Since data is the real “crown jewel” of any business, the encryption alone is sufficient reason to use Windows 2000 or XP and NTFS 5 on a mobile computer.

Whilst Windows NT and NTFS 4 appear to allow permission based access to files and folders, this is only valid whilst the operating system is intact and running. If a new copy of Windows NT was installed onto the same disk, it is a simple matter to retrieve the supposedly secured data. This means that data on a stolen laptop can be retrieved with a minimum of effort.

Encryption (encoding data so that it is unreadable without a password or other proof by a user that they are authorized to see the data) on Windows 2000 can be made very tight, making a lost laptop tough to crack open to discover business data or confidential information.


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NTFS v4
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HPFS
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