Like this CertiGuide? Get it in PDF format!
Click Here!

Custom Search







Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (A+ 4 Real)
 9  Chapter 9: Graphic Cards
      9  Card Components, Modes and Architecture

Previous Topic/Section
Card Components, Modes and Architecture
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
SVGA/XGA
Next Topic/Section

Display Modes

As graphics cards evolved, many different methods of actually displaying graphics were invented, and manufacturers desperately needed to standardize their architecture to ensure their graphics cards worked with as wide a range of hardware and software as possible. Much like today's standards struggle with rewriteable DVD formats, manufacturers needed to standardize display modes. To enable this, the VESA (Video Electronics Standards Association) was formed.

The most common standard that VESA defined was VGA, short for Video Graphics Adapter. Manufacturers began designing their cards to follow the VGA standard, whilst including many other additional features (called extensions). This was an important stage in the development of video cards, as it finally meant that operating systems could provide a standard VGA driver that was guaranteed to work with any VGA compliant card, ensuring that regardless of the make or model the user would always be able to see graphic output on their monitor. A classic example of this is Microsoft Windows, which comes with a default VGA adapter driver. If a VGA compliant video card that Windows does not have a plug and play driver for is installed into your machine, the standard VGA driver will be loaded automatically. This is exceptionally important in Windows, where the entire operating system is graphical user interface based - if there was no VGA standard Windows would not have a standard VGA adapter driver, and without a standard VGA driver it would not be able to display any output on your monitor. Moreover, without being able to see what you were doing, you would need some incredible luck (or an exceptional memory) to be able to install the correct driver for the card!

Because VGA attempts to be the lowest common denominator, its main issue is that it only supports 16 colors at 640*480, or 256 colors at 320 * 240. Whilst that is fine for getting a machine up and running with the right drivers, it is less than ideal for normal use.


Previous Topic/Section
Card Components, Modes and Architecture
Previous Page
Pages in Current Topic/Section
1
Next Page
SVGA/XGA
Next Topic/Section

If you find CertiGuide.com useful, please consider making a small Paypal donation to help the site, using one of the buttons below. You can also donate a custom amount using the far right button (not less than $1 please, or PayPal gets most/all of your money!) In lieu of a larger donation, you may wish to consider buying an inexpensive PDF equivalent of the CertiGuide to A+ (A+ 4 Real) from StudyExam4Less.com. Thanks for your support!
Donate $2
Donate $5
Donate $10
Donate $20
Donate $30
Donate: $



Home - Table Of Contents - Contact Us

CertiGuide to A+ (A+ 4 Real) (http://www.CertiGuide.com/apfr/) on CertiGuide.com
Version 1.0 - Version Date: March 29, 2005

Adapted with permission from a work created by Tcat Houser et al.
CertiGuide.com Version Copyright 2005 Charles M. Kozierok. All Rights Reserved.
Not responsible for any loss resulting from the use of this site.