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Table Of Contents  CertiGuide to A+ (A+ 4 Real)
 9  Introduction and “Guide to the Guide”

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Acknowledgments

I like to express a sincere “thank-you” to our authors and contributors -- without them this work would not have been created:

Since A+ 4 Real is not your typical book, this acknowledgement section is not your typical yada-yada.

To paraphrase from General Motors in its last attempt to shore up the Oldsmobile line before sending it the way of the Edsel: “This is not your fathers A+ tests.” Anybody who thinks they ‘get’ the A+ tests and have not personally attempted to get through both of them using the 2003 objectives has an Alice In Wonderland view of what challenges lie in front of the candidate. As I tell my classes, “These babies ride in on a broom and proceed to poke you with the pointy end of said broom, without mercy.”

How CompTIA gets away with calling these tests “entry level” is beyond me. However, that is another rant; I will save for another space.

Given that, in a rare moment I’m really at a loss of the proper words to convey the efforts put forth by an incredible team of people. Based on results, they have taken on the impossible and done a remarkable job. Based on testing in the classroom I know if you listen to your authors, you will beat back the dueling witches of A+. That is no small factoid.

And in completing this section, there is yet another limitation. Communication by paper or e-book is serial in nature. There is no way to truly convey the concept of a TEAM, unless you have had the pleasure of being a part of a very dynamic one.

I rarely invoke the English word, love. I reserve it for very serious thoughts. I want to thank the entire team for their unselfish love in helping the readers. Their efforts to help you can be seen in the work. My love of their giving is beyond words.

With that said, I give you:

  • Ian Kayne: Ian and I have worked together before on the Security+ book. My judgment is either he is an autistic savant or one of the most giving and caring units using oxygen on planet earth today. What else could it be after living through Security+ and coming back for more? His attention to detail and sheer amount of effort has more than earned him 1st chair on this reader.

  • Gudrun Funk: Without her efforts, this work would have never seen the light of day. As the scope of effort to be successful with the A+ 2003 objectives became obvious, the “update” to the previous A+ entries began to make building the pyramids a preferable task. The effort, however glorious in heart, hit a wall that seemed unbreakable. Gudrun came in with the determination rarely seen in life.

  • Maxim Ratinov: How to thank someone who has contributed to a work in English when it isn’t even his 2nd, 3rd or even 4th language? Clearly his first language is IOS ;-) And he has mastered the most important language. That is contribution. Over the years I have gotten to know in a virtual way, Maxim and his family. It is my sincere hope that I get to meet this most generous person, along with his wonderfully supporting wife and his parents, in person. Any company in North America would be wise to sponsor this incredible talent to their benefit.

  • Phil Hopkins: Phil is another one whom I appreciate beyond words and still do not understand. Why anyone would write not one but two awesome chapters on Linux, knowing that it is strictly for the benefit of the reader and not going to be tested… as I said. I don’t get it. Thankfully, you do.

  • Christine Schmied: On the other side of the pond is Christine. In some order of the universe, Phil and Christine must be related. After all, Linux and the MAC OS X series are cousins! Christine brought a huge enthusiasm to the team. She got me sold on getting a G5 based computer as soon as the “Tiger” O/S releases in the spring of 2005! Thank you Christine, for shedding a light on a better computing way for the rest of us. Maybe you should do a book on Wireless certification!

  • James Pyles: Ah. Here is someone I can sort of understand, since he also calls the Pacific Northwest of the United States home. Now if only I can figure out how he did such a great job of dissecting MS-XP … Maybe someday I will be as good at communications as he is. Thankfully, you don’t have to wait for that someday moment. James whopped the beast called XP. Here, I will thank James for making your world more manageable.

  • Frederick Carr: To say Fred is unique would be an understatement! ;-) He is one of the few team members who I got to meet in the physical world. (And he has some embarrassing JPGs to prove it!) Fred brings to the reader only one or maybe two answers to your success with A+. All of the rest of his work is there to prevent you from winning a Darwin Award. I’ll call that a bigger win then passing A+. I’ll thank Fred here for saving your life.

  • George P. Lister: The thanks we ALL owe George (SuperTech on the Internet), cannot be measured. It is SuperTech that showed us all the path of getting a CST. I can say that has pleased more students than I can count. The combination of the old ExamInsight books along with the A+ 4 Real book promises a CST certification. George appears in several parts of the reader, showing his diversity.

  • Milan Kosanovi: If I could ask one more favor of Milan, it would be to find me a CTT+ training gig to do in Moscow so I could take him and his family to dinner there. My passport is ready soon Milan! ;-) Since Aristotle, the older folks have complained about the younger generation and how the world is going to hell in a hand basket. Milan echoes many of my personal interests. I’ll go off pushing daisies in my next career happily knowing Milan is more than enough to fill my shoes. Find out for yourself in this reader.

  • The Rest of the Clan: Gosh. The input and support from so many others is unbelievable. The hard reality of production costs forced the deletion of so much fine effort. Even an e-book carries costs of transfer, storage as well as ink and paper when printed. The team did a serious consideration of creating a volume set. For right, or not… we didn’t.

 

Tcat Houser


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Chapter 1: What are Operating Systems and How Do They Work?
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Version 1.0 - Version Date: March 29, 2005

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